Archive | July, 2011

Sprint-Out Pass – RB Blocking

31 Jul
It’s about speed and leverage.  Speed to the perimeter and leverage at the edge.

To get there faster — “there” being the outside — many coaches will run their sprint-out to the weakside since that represents the shortest distance to the perimeter.

Weakside and Edge

It’s how we run it and it’s the scheme we most often saw used in our research.

But how you “set the edge” as coaches say — meaning how you leverage the contain defender — will determine if you even get into the perimeter.

At our level the edge is generally occupied by a DE in a wide technique.  He’s purposely set outside to prevent the perimeter from being exploited.   Sealing him off presents a few challenges, especially if he’s taught to widen when attacked.

Wide DE Alignment

If you’re using a Full Zone scheme, you’re basically reaching and sliding on the first step and, if no contact is made, hinging on the second.   But if the DE is still beyond the PST’s reach attempt then many coaches will teach him to get on the DE’s inside hip/number and bench him towards the sideline.

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Greatest Comeback Ever?

28 Jul

Greatest comeback ever?  Maybe.  Three onside kicks give new meaning to the expression, “Never give up”.   But one poorly covered kick-off can, as one annoucer says, make you want to throw up.

Blocking the Sprint-Out Pass: Turnback, Hinge and Combination

23 Jul

Turnback

We’ve done a ton of research on this subject and consulted with various sources and found that coaches favoring the Turnback scheme point to the pressing need to protect the QB’s backside first.  The best way to do this is to slide your OL to the backside.

Essentially Turnback is like Full Zone in that its a zone scheme but flipped to the backside.  According to Mike Pope,  the OL Coach at Wingate University, the OL drop or bucket step towards their backside gap and, using the Gap rule to define their area of responsibility, engage the first defender aligned in their zone or the one trying to cross their face.

Mike, who also doubles as the Camp Director for Hawg Tuff O-Line Camps, says it’s pretty simple but very effective versus stunting and blitzing defenses.

Turnback Protection

True Turnback, we have learned, does not start with a lateral step to the playside followed by a drop step so that the OL’s back is angled away from the playside.  That’s Hinge protection.

Two different terms, two different techniques.

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The Team That Invented Football – Conclusion

20 Jul

by Sally Jenkins, Sports Illustrated

To take advantage of the Indians’ versatility Warner drew up a new offense.  Camp would dub it “the Carlisle formation,” but later it would be known as the single wing.  It was predicated on one small move: Warner shifted a halfback out wide, to outflank the opposing tackle, forming something that looked like a wing.  It opened up a world of possibilities.  The Indians could line up as if to punt — and then throw.  No one would know whether they were going to run, pass or kick.  For added measure Warner taught his quarterbacks to sprint out a few yards to their left or their right, buying more time to throw.  The rest of the players flooded downfield and knocked down any opponent who might be able to intercept or bat away the pass.

Single Wing - Cal Poly Pomona 1924

Single Wing - Princeton 1950

“How the Indians did take to it!” Warner remembered.  “Light on their feet as professional dancers, and every one amazingly skillful with his hands, the redskins pirouetted in and out until the receiver was well down the field, and then they shot the ball like a bullet.”  Carlisle roared off to a 6-0 start. On Oct. 26 they went to Philadelphia to face unbeaten Penn, ranked fourth in the nation, before a crowd of 22,800.  No team all season had crossed the Quakers’ goal line.  But on just the second play of the game Hauser whipped a 40-yard pass over the middle that William Gardner caught on a dead run to set up a touchdown.

Hauser

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Trick Play by Steve Spurrier

19 Jul

Looks like the star burst kick-off return.  You’d definitely need solid blocking up front to give the play time to develop.

The Team That Invented Football – Part 2

18 Jul
by Sally Jenkins, Sports Illustrated

The Carlisle practice field was a piece of hardpan that could chip the blade off a shovel. It was an uneven, rock-strewn acre irrigated with the Indians’ sweat. The players themselves had dug the field, measured it, graded it and sodded it.

On a September day in 1899, Warner stood on the field and scrutinized his new football team. His heart dropped to his shoes.  The players were “listless and scrawny, many looking as if they had been drawn through a knothole,” he would recall later.  Over the next 13 years, the coach would have just one Carlisle team whose players averaged more than 170 pounds.

Carlisle Indians - 1899

Warner was 28 when he was hired by Carlisle on the recommendation of Camp, for whom he had played at Cornell before going on to coach football at Georgia, Iowa State and his alma mater. Warner had a reputation for creativity.   At Georgia he had experimented with the screen pass and the tackling dummy.  He also developed theories of fitness, diet, training and motivation.  He rousted the Bulldogs at 6 a.m. for five-mile runs and locked them in their dorm at night.  He was an authoritarian who backed up his words with physical force; he gave up scrimmaging with the Bulldogs only when he broke the collarbone of one of his players. Then in two seasons as Cornell’s head coach he went 15-5-1.

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Blocking the Sprint-Out Pass: Full Zone

15 Jul

In blocking the sprint-out pass, we’re thinking that you should use a scheme that works with your run game.  Its primary goal should be to quickly get the QB beyond contain and into the perimeter where he can threaten the defense.

Full-Zone is one way to block the sprint-out.  So is Turnback.  But the most common way to protect a sprint-out is to Hinge which is routinely called Turnback protection but isn’t.

All are area blocking schemes and all are simple to teach.

Full Zone

“Full Zone” is short-hand.  It means everyone on the line is using zone blocking techniques and stepping laterally in the same direction.  Put more simply, everyone is reaching to the playside.

The most common rule is that each lineman is responsible for the defender in the playside gap between his nose and the shoulder of the adjacent playside lineman.

Zones using Gap Rule

Some coaches, however, will broaden the boundaries of an OL’s zone of responsibility by using a “nose-to-nose” rule.  The linemen block the defender aligned between his nose and the nose of the adjacent playside lineman.

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