Tag Archives: Double Wing

Terminology: Shovel Pass

19 Aug

It’s “shovel” pass.  Not shuffle or shuttle, but shovel!

“Cactus” Jack Curtice is credited with developing the nifty little pass play that has so many coaches and fans alike confused as to what to actually call it.

Because of the pass play’s unique throwing motion — a kind of hybrid overhanded, pitch forward — the term “shovel” pass was the first name assigned the technique some decades ago.  It was later twisted into the erroneous nom de guerres presently associated with the play because some people either can’t spell or pronounce the word, “shovel”.

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Now there’s some disagreement as to who first developed the pass play.   Some say Walter “Bug” Bujkowski and others point to “Cactus Jack Curtice as the play’s principal architect. We’ll let you decide who deserves the credit.

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What’s Old Is New…

29 Jan

The Single Wing, as seen here in this video, is the basis for the modern Wildcat and all it’s variations.  Even Don Markham’s Double Wing has its roots in the Pop Warner system.  Here in the video, the Single Wing is mixed in with a little Notre Dame Box which started out looking like the “T” Formation — back then it was called the “Regular” Formation — then shifted into various overloaded sets that created leverage and confusion.  Check it out.   If you’re lucky enough to have a long-snapper or can develop one — probably two — then the  Single Wing is a simple system to teach and powerful in its execution.


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Defending the Double Wing

27 Jan

By Tim Fox
Football Core Values
January 12, 2011

I want to discuss some fine points we, as a staff and team, focused on when facing the Double Wing.

1. Our first priority, like usual, was aligning properly. The weeks prior to our match-up with the DW opponent, they revealed a number of interesting formations and change ups to their foot-to-foot, traditional 2-TE, 2-Wing look. They came out in the “Beast” package a few times (we’ll get into that later) and various spread formations. They had little success utilizing those formations in the preseason, but it was still important that we be able to line up and defend their favorite plays out of those formations.

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