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Blocking the Sprint-Out Pass: Full Zone

15 Jul

In blocking the sprint-out pass, we’re thinking that you should use a scheme that works with your run game.  Its primary goal should be to quickly get the QB beyond contain and into the perimeter where he can threaten the defense.

Full-Zone is one way to block the sprint-out.  So is Turnback.  But the most common way to protect a sprint-out is to Hinge which is routinely called Turnback protection but isn’t.

All are area blocking schemes and all are simple to teach.

Full Zone

“Full Zone” is short-hand.  It means everyone on the line is using zone blocking techniques and stepping laterally in the same direction.  Put more simply, everyone is reaching to the playside.

The most common rule is that each lineman is responsible for the defender in the playside gap between his nose and the shoulder of the adjacent playside lineman.

Zones using Gap Rule

Some coaches, however, will broaden the boundaries of an OL’s zone of responsibility by using a “nose-to-nose” rule.  The linemen block the defender aligned between his nose and the nose of the adjacent playside lineman.

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Zone Block or Not?

15 Feb

So you just watched some college or pro team run crazy through an opponent using a Zone scheme and you’re thinking you want to do that.  Why not, it sure looks simple with everybody stepping to the playside.  But before you do, consider this: it isn’t simple!

Zone Blocking is sophisticated.  It requires two things that are scarce at the youth level: time and skill.  Time to teach it and rep it and the kind of skill that comes from experience with and hopefully mastery of basic blocking technique.

If a kid can’t Drive Block, he can’t Zone either.

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